click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 12
MSNBCW 11
CNN 9
CSPAN2 5
CSPAN 4
MSNBC 3
KGO (ABC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian stock market plunged 10 percent today. such a dramatic plunge has not been seen since mubarek was over thrown one year ago. >> thank you very much for that live report from cairo. >> it has been nearly two ye
continues over the benghazi terror attack. we'll discuss the situation in egypt. the cease-fire in gaza, and the libya investigation when we sit down with senator john mccain. it's a fox news sunday exclusive. then is the looming fiscal cliff casting a shadow over shoppers and investors this holiday season? visions of bargains are dancing in the heads of consumers. will the possibility of higher attackses slow them down. we'll talk with matthew shay, president of the national retail federation and john sweeney of fidelity investments. the holiday is over for white house and congressional leaders trying to make a deal. we'll ask our sunday panel if they can reach a compromise. >>> a thanksgiving tradition, our power player of the week has me dancing with turkeys, all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. on this holiday weekend we're watching several major foreign policy developments from egypt to gaza to the continuing converse over the benghazi attack. to talk about it all is senator john mccain. welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> thank y
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
need to help the libyans train a national army. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: ther
into israel and firing back on twitter, warning israel has "opened the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of the new york times and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the failout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes as well since the killing of ahmed al jabari, the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we are just hearing this from the military spokesperson that they are bringing in reservists, but they are consider iing a ground war, but they have not yet given the go ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fir
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
about egypt? could we see this president reached out to the president and talk about what is going on? >> the president, as you know, has broken no on numerous occasions with president -- has occasions mn numerous with numerousoris. -- with president morsi going forward. i do not have an agenda on what those conversations with look- alike. we have raised concerns. the state department put out a statement on this about the briefing. the state department have more information of this of a client how he has communicated those concerns. our interest is in the process, the transition to a democracy continuing in the development of a government that reflects the will of the egyptian people. we are working towards that. we believe it is in the interest of the american people and of the united states but also because it reflects the will and the interest of the egyptian people. >> democracy is in the process, but doesn't look like there is a transitioning to a dictatorship? >> important to take a step back. in november 2012, lookout -- look at how much has changed in that region of since late
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
from iran that it basically needs to provoke the muslim brotherhood in egypt to be more supportive of it. perhaps it's iran wanting to deflect attention from syria. perhaps it's an effort by hamas to in effect bridle its credentials to prove to the palestinians on the west bank that its route is the best way to deal with israel. >> while britain and germany have both said hamas bears the brunt of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental st
to egypt today where he would appeal personally for deescalating the violence. why did he go to egypt? after ousting hosni mo bark, negotiations are going on as we speak and i hope we will reach something soon that will stop the violence and counterviolence. the whole world is working on trying to deescalate this conflict. the european union weighed in today as did russia. russia preparing a u.n. resolution calling for a cease fire. probably our closest ally abroad in matters of war and peace is britain, and they are taking the same line as president obama, although they are being even more direct about it. the foreign secretary saying that hamas bares responsibility for what's going on, but he warns that "a ground invasion of gaza would lose israel a lot of the international support they have in this situation." a ground invasion is more difficult for the international community to sympathize with or support. so the world, at least the world of the united states and our allies is pretty much speaking with one voice here. israel, stop the ground work thing. that's the message from the
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
you overseas where more than 100,000 people in the middle of a very angry political protest in egypt. their demands and concerns about yet another major uprising there. >> talk about another sense of deja vu. wow. >>> also this half hour, a major consumer alert about pork. trusted researchers found a dangerous form of bacteria in the uncooked meat and potential for trouble for your family. it does not end there. so beware what's on the dinner plate, folks. >> just make sure you cook it really good. >>> and later, the massive uproar for producers of the sitcom "two and a half men" after angus t. jones told the public not to woch. so is the show cursed? we'll get to that. >> they've had a rocky 18 months, that's for sure. >> mm-hmm. >>> but first, the clock is ticking down toward tonight's half a billion-dollar power ball lottery. players from california and nevada, which don't have the powerball, have been streaming into the state of arizona. in fact, to buy their tickets. yet another immigration problem for governor brewer in arizona. >> some said they waited in line an hour and a ha
or the cia felt at that point that this was a protest as a result of what happened with the film with egypt. he clarified that after more information came in, there was not a protest. >> general petraeus' testimony comes today the morning after cia acting director michael morell and james clapper the director of national int intelligence went before members of congress in two other hearings and hours after attorney general eric holder defended the decision not to bring members of congress into the loop sooner. >> we follow the facts. we do not share outside the justice department, outside the fbi the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. >> let's jump right in and bring in our friday morning political power panel. we have jackie kucinich political reporter for "usa today", democratic strategist blake zeb and msnbc contributor robert trainum. great to have you all here. we just heard from congressman king earlier today saying the general was asked right off the top whether the affair ha
to egypt hoping the leaders can solve the mess. >> the egyptian have an interest in the region not exploding. they will have to take serious steps to make it clear to hamas they will lose support. >> egypt watch what you do and how you do it. you are teetering with the congress of having aid cut off if you continue to incite violence. >> brian: what about the arab democracy? our next guest is a former cia agent with the unit. michael, another conflict between the israelis and palestinians. and the center piece is gaza. what is different now? >> what is different now, america had invested in 50 years in tyranny to make sure israel was suppressed and the america protected. when arab spring came. people including senator graham predicted just a secular democracy and it was a arab spring of secularism. people will turn in a time of turmoil to their faith or what they believed in for a thousand years. we have governments in libya where our people were killed and now in egypt that are going to support their breathern. >> brian: what is the best conclusion and best way to end. >> i am
of the next 10 years. judith came across one day this thing called the egypt influence network, a depiction around the time that mubarak fell. and if you google it, it is this blog of blue, red and purple circles. the blue are people treating in english. the red people in arabic, those in both languages come in the google executive is right in the heart of this. so having become one of the state department's more avid twitter is, i do fair number of followers including the middle east that if you look at the map, i was often the fringe. i was on the map, but not really in the middle of the conversation. that is the challenge is the technology does provide the opportunity to get in the middle of a conversation and probably the good news is the evolution from which happened under judas watched of the center for strategic counterterrorism communication, with a purposely go in and insert themselves into extreme chat rooms to generate a debate and to try to change, for lack of a better term, hearts and minds, or engage in the competition judith was talking about. so there is an opportunity here,
this is different than what's happening in egypt. they are not protesting the movie. it was fairly obvious almost the c.i.a. writes up a report that explains this is a terrorist attack and someone in the administration amended it to say or it could have been about the movie. >> they certainly didn't want to say al-qaeda, hamas or hezbollah. they didn't want to blame someone early. here is the white house defending their position, the spokesperson president press briefing. >> there are no unanswered questions about ambassador rice's appearance on sundays shows and the talking points that she used for those appearances that were provided by the intelligence community. those questions have been answered. >> cenk: yeah, look, again i'm not putting it on susan rice. someone changed the talking points. john mccain is on with her on that same face the nation says no way it's a terrorist attack, it was coordinated. >> they had the talking points and went against them. you're with the three amigos, you're the fourth amigo. >> cenk: let's go on to something different. touree. >> old white establishment fol
interest. you take a look at egypt. under the original peace plan, we give tremendous amount of foreign aid to egypt. right now egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arabs spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're spending the egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a piece. if you are not participating, you do not get them. we have to continue our commitment in foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country. we need to do everything we can to fulfil our commitment. the military aides we still is a real is that right here in america. when you look at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope that this would be continuing democracy, and we're falling into what has become not secular governments, but religious governments, and we need to be gathering up all of our allies and be making a firm statement that this region needs to be statement -- stabilized. we need to protect the people who serve and our state departments, not in all facets, whether ngo's the state department. it cannot procu
profound effect. to explain how, let me take a detour into the air by spring. in egypt last year when the government shutdown the internet and shut down global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean that they can do that. it's a very important question. but let me focus on another important question that few people asked. how did egypt, to have an internet and a mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy accomplishments of the clinton administration that most people, present company excluded, have never heard of. world trade organization agreement on basic telecommunications. back in the 1990s, monopolies operated communication networks in most countries around the world, generally government owned or controlled monopolies. that was the world most of us grew up in. it was before the internet and mobile communications took off, and it's not a coincidence at the end of that world coincided with a take off of mobile and the internet. in any event back then in the '90s, leaders at the white house, at the state depart
proactive and extending aid to egypt before and after morsi was elected, and i think it's important to understand what sort of things egypt needed right away was an ability to sell government bonds and treasury bills were because it takes about 14% interest which is pretty high for a government come and immediate deaths things look terrible. they came in and said okay. we will buy your one month issue of bills. a good payment unless the government defaults on everything. but that has helped relieve some of the interest pressure and try to move egypt out of the debt trap than greece or italy or spain. the second thing they have done is like the development bank there's quite good development banks that help identify the investment projects, make sure they are built without corruption and that they become effective. i think it is $4.5 billion that were qatar and saudi arabia have and christine was out there in september and they were working on a long program, very low interest rate and there would be another four and a half million or so but then egypt has a fighting chance to get an
the world in egypt, libya, tripoli and may or may not happen 400 miles away in benghazi regardless. but that's what susan rice was saying. there were protests but this was a terrorist act. there was misinformation. we don't know. but to turn that around when four americans died, even ambassador stevens parents said, please stop politicizing the death of my son. they have no shame. >> none of us should walk over the feelings of the families that lost these four american lives. thank you so much for your time. >> thanks. >> coming up, are you sure you want to fight this guy? president obama's very tough and very blunt talk on taxes today. what are republicans saying behind closed doors tonight? plus, the former gop king maker is making all kinds of excuses. wait until you hear who karl rove is blaming his epic fail on. >>> and breaking tonight for the first time we are hearing what mitt romney thinks about why he lost. it was a conference call with his national finance committee and it was explosive. he's talking about african-americans and women. you will definitely want to hear this one. you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)